WHRO LIVE LISTEN WATCH EDUCATE CORPORATE SUPPORT US DONATE CONTACT US ENEWS myWHRO

AMERICA REFRAMED

WATCH NOW ON DEMAND

Tuesday, December 1st

8:00pm on
Runtime: 01:26:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

100 Years: One Woman's Fight for Justice

Elouise Cobell is a little known hero whose relentless pursuit of justice led her to find remedy for over half a million American Indian account holders whose funds were held by the U.S. government in trust for a century. An advocate for Native American financial self-determination and independence, she initiated new ways of viewing tribal trust funds and their management. In 1996, she led a lawsuit against the U.S. government for failing to pass on to individual American Indian landowners monies they had earned under oil, timber and mineral leases. "100 YEARS" is the compelling story of Elouise Cobell, a petite Blackfeet warrior from Montana, the great granddaughter of the legendary, Mountain Chief, and how she prevailed.

Wednesday, December 2nd

12:00am on
Runtime: 01:26:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

100 Years: One Woman's Fight for Justice

Elouise Cobell is a little known hero whose relentless pursuit of justice led her to find remedy for over half a million American Indian account holders whose funds were held by the U.S. government in trust for a century. An advocate for Native American financial self-determination and independence, she initiated new ways of viewing tribal trust funds and their management. In 1996, she led a lawsuit against the U.S. government for failing to pass on to individual American Indian landowners monies they had earned under oil, timber and mineral leases. "100 YEARS" is the compelling story of Elouise Cobell, a petite Blackfeet warrior from Montana, the great granddaughter of the legendary, Mountain Chief, and how she prevailed.

8:00am on
Runtime: 01:26:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

100 Years: One Woman's Fight for Justice

Elouise Cobell is a little known hero whose relentless pursuit of justice led her to find remedy for over half a million American Indian account holders whose funds were held by the U.S. government in trust for a century. An advocate for Native American financial self-determination and independence, she initiated new ways of viewing tribal trust funds and their management. In 1996, she led a lawsuit against the U.S. government for failing to pass on to individual American Indian landowners monies they had earned under oil, timber and mineral leases. "100 YEARS" is the compelling story of Elouise Cobell, a petite Blackfeet warrior from Montana, the great granddaughter of the legendary, Mountain Chief, and how she prevailed.

Saturday, December 5th

10:00pm on
Runtime: 01:26:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

100 Years: One Woman's Fight for Justice

Elouise Cobell is a little known hero whose relentless pursuit of justice led her to find remedy for over half a million American Indian account holders whose funds were held by the U.S. government in trust for a century. An advocate for Native American financial self-determination and independence, she initiated new ways of viewing tribal trust funds and their management. In 1996, she led a lawsuit against the U.S. government for failing to pass on to individual American Indian landowners monies they had earned under oil, timber and mineral leases. "100 YEARS" is the compelling story of Elouise Cobell, a petite Blackfeet warrior from Montana, the great granddaughter of the legendary, Mountain Chief, and how she prevailed.

Sunday, December 6th

2:00am on
Runtime: 01:26:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

100 Years: One Woman's Fight for Justice

Elouise Cobell is a little known hero whose relentless pursuit of justice led her to find remedy for over half a million American Indian account holders whose funds were held by the U.S. government in trust for a century. An advocate for Native American financial self-determination and independence, she initiated new ways of viewing tribal trust funds and their management. In 1996, she led a lawsuit against the U.S. government for failing to pass on to individual American Indian landowners monies they had earned under oil, timber and mineral leases. "100 YEARS" is the compelling story of Elouise Cobell, a petite Blackfeet warrior from Montana, the great granddaughter of the legendary, Mountain Chief, and how she prevailed.

9:00am on
Runtime: 01:26:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

100 Years: One Woman's Fight for Justice

Elouise Cobell is a little known hero whose relentless pursuit of justice led her to find remedy for over half a million American Indian account holders whose funds were held by the U.S. government in trust for a century. An advocate for Native American financial self-determination and independence, she initiated new ways of viewing tribal trust funds and their management. In 1996, she led a lawsuit against the U.S. government for failing to pass on to individual American Indian landowners monies they had earned under oil, timber and mineral leases. "100 YEARS" is the compelling story of Elouise Cobell, a petite Blackfeet warrior from Montana, the great granddaughter of the legendary, Mountain Chief, and how she prevailed.

Tuesday, December 8th

8:00pm on
Runtime: 01:32:03
Widescreen
Watch Now!

There Are Jews Here

There Are Jews Here follows the untold stories of four once thriving American Jewish communities that are now barely holding on. Struggling with aging congregants and dwindling interest, families are moving to larger cities with more robust congregations. An affecting portrait of people who are doing their part to keep the Jewish spirit alive, There Are Jews Here celebrates religious diversity in small-town America.

Wednesday, December 9th

12:00am on
Runtime: 01:32:03
Widescreen
Watch Now!

There Are Jews Here

There Are Jews Here follows the untold stories of four once thriving American Jewish communities that are now barely holding on. Struggling with aging congregants and dwindling interest, families are moving to larger cities with more robust congregations. An affecting portrait of people who are doing their part to keep the Jewish spirit alive, There Are Jews Here celebrates religious diversity in small-town America.

8:00am on
Runtime: 01:32:03
Widescreen
Watch Now!

There Are Jews Here

There Are Jews Here follows the untold stories of four once thriving American Jewish communities that are now barely holding on. Struggling with aging congregants and dwindling interest, families are moving to larger cities with more robust congregations. An affecting portrait of people who are doing their part to keep the Jewish spirit alive, There Are Jews Here celebrates religious diversity in small-town America.

Saturday, December 12th

10:00pm on
Runtime: 01:32:03
Widescreen
Watch Now!

There Are Jews Here

There Are Jews Here follows the untold stories of four once thriving American Jewish communities that are now barely holding on. Struggling with aging congregants and dwindling interest, families are moving to larger cities with more robust congregations. An affecting portrait of people who are doing their part to keep the Jewish spirit alive, There Are Jews Here celebrates religious diversity in small-town America.

Sunday, December 13th

2:00am on
Runtime: 01:32:03
Widescreen
Watch Now!

There Are Jews Here

There Are Jews Here follows the untold stories of four once thriving American Jewish communities that are now barely holding on. Struggling with aging congregants and dwindling interest, families are moving to larger cities with more robust congregations. An affecting portrait of people who are doing their part to keep the Jewish spirit alive, There Are Jews Here celebrates religious diversity in small-town America.

9:00am on
Runtime: 01:32:03
Widescreen
Watch Now!

There Are Jews Here

There Are Jews Here follows the untold stories of four once thriving American Jewish communities that are now barely holding on. Struggling with aging congregants and dwindling interest, families are moving to larger cities with more robust congregations. An affecting portrait of people who are doing their part to keep the Jewish spirit alive, There Are Jews Here celebrates religious diversity in small-town America.

5:00pm on
Runtime: 01:32:03
Widescreen
Watch Now!

There Are Jews Here

There Are Jews Here follows the untold stories of four once thriving American Jewish communities that are now barely holding on. Struggling with aging congregants and dwindling interest, families are moving to larger cities with more robust congregations. An affecting portrait of people who are doing their part to keep the Jewish spirit alive, There Are Jews Here celebrates religious diversity in small-town America.

Tuesday, December 15th

8:00pm on
Runtime: 00:56:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

Random Acts of Legacy

Today, we have the luxury of being able to document our lives in an instant, but during the Great Depression and into the 1950s, this luxury was almost nonexistent. Filmmaker and director Ali Kazimi knew he stumbled upon a rare artifact when he found himself in an online bidding war for film footage from 1936 to 1951. The old home movies had a name attached to it, Silas Fung, and offered a little-seen glimpse into how a Chinese family embraced American customs. Fung was a first-generation Chinese American commercial artist who had a passion for filming home movies. Restoring Fung's films took years, but Kazimi succeeded in keeping this family's archive intact. What he found was a look at everyday life, from ice cream cakes on birthdays, to an obsession with the 1933 Chicago World's Fair.

Wednesday, December 16th

12:00am on
Runtime: 00:56:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

Random Acts of Legacy

Today, we have the luxury of being able to document our lives in an instant, but during the Great Depression and into the 1950s, this luxury was almost nonexistent. Filmmaker and director Ali Kazimi knew he stumbled upon a rare artifact when he found himself in an online bidding war for film footage from 1936 to 1951. The old home movies had a name attached to it, Silas Fung, and offered a little-seen glimpse into how a Chinese family embraced American customs. Fung was a first-generation Chinese American commercial artist who had a passion for filming home movies. Restoring Fung's films took years, but Kazimi succeeded in keeping this family's archive intact. What he found was a look at everyday life, from ice cream cakes on birthdays, to an obsession with the 1933 Chicago World's Fair.

8:00am on
Runtime: 00:56:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

Random Acts of Legacy

Today, we have the luxury of being able to document our lives in an instant, but during the Great Depression and into the 1950s, this luxury was almost nonexistent. Filmmaker and director Ali Kazimi knew he stumbled upon a rare artifact when he found himself in an online bidding war for film footage from 1936 to 1951. The old home movies had a name attached to it, Silas Fung, and offered a little-seen glimpse into how a Chinese family embraced American customs. Fung was a first-generation Chinese American commercial artist who had a passion for filming home movies. Restoring Fung's films took years, but Kazimi succeeded in keeping this family's archive intact. What he found was a look at everyday life, from ice cream cakes on birthdays, to an obsession with the 1933 Chicago World's Fair.

Saturday, December 19th

10:00pm on
Runtime: 00:56:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

Random Acts of Legacy

Today, we have the luxury of being able to document our lives in an instant, but during the Great Depression and into the 1950s, this luxury was almost nonexistent. Filmmaker and director Ali Kazimi knew he stumbled upon a rare artifact when he found himself in an online bidding war for film footage from 1936 to 1951. The old home movies had a name attached to it, Silas Fung, and offered a little-seen glimpse into how a Chinese family embraced American customs. Fung was a first-generation Chinese American commercial artist who had a passion for filming home movies. Restoring Fung's films took years, but Kazimi succeeded in keeping this family's archive intact. What he found was a look at everyday life, from ice cream cakes on birthdays, to an obsession with the 1933 Chicago World's Fair.

Sunday, December 20th

2:00am on
Runtime: 00:56:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

Random Acts of Legacy

Today, we have the luxury of being able to document our lives in an instant, but during the Great Depression and into the 1950s, this luxury was almost nonexistent. Filmmaker and director Ali Kazimi knew he stumbled upon a rare artifact when he found himself in an online bidding war for film footage from 1936 to 1951. The old home movies had a name attached to it, Silas Fung, and offered a little-seen glimpse into how a Chinese family embraced American customs. Fung was a first-generation Chinese American commercial artist who had a passion for filming home movies. Restoring Fung's films took years, but Kazimi succeeded in keeping this family's archive intact. What he found was a look at everyday life, from ice cream cakes on birthdays, to an obsession with the 1933 Chicago World's Fair.

9:00am on
Runtime: 00:56:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

Random Acts of Legacy

Today, we have the luxury of being able to document our lives in an instant, but during the Great Depression and into the 1950s, this luxury was almost nonexistent. Filmmaker and director Ali Kazimi knew he stumbled upon a rare artifact when he found himself in an online bidding war for film footage from 1936 to 1951. The old home movies had a name attached to it, Silas Fung, and offered a little-seen glimpse into how a Chinese family embraced American customs. Fung was a first-generation Chinese American commercial artist who had a passion for filming home movies. Restoring Fung's films took years, but Kazimi succeeded in keeping this family's archive intact. What he found was a look at everyday life, from ice cream cakes on birthdays, to an obsession with the 1933 Chicago World's Fair.

5:00pm on
Runtime: 00:56:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

Random Acts of Legacy

Today, we have the luxury of being able to document our lives in an instant, but during the Great Depression and into the 1950s, this luxury was almost nonexistent. Filmmaker and director Ali Kazimi knew he stumbled upon a rare artifact when he found himself in an online bidding war for film footage from 1936 to 1951. The old home movies had a name attached to it, Silas Fung, and offered a little-seen glimpse into how a Chinese family embraced American customs. Fung was a first-generation Chinese American commercial artist who had a passion for filming home movies. Restoring Fung's films took years, but Kazimi succeeded in keeping this family's archive intact. What he found was a look at everyday life, from ice cream cakes on birthdays, to an obsession with the 1933 Chicago World's Fair.

Tuesday, December 22nd

8:00pm on
Runtime: 01:26:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

Agents of Change

Agents of Change looks at a pivotal moment when our nation was caught at the intersection of the Civil Rights, Black Power, and Anti-Vietnam War Movements. The film examines the racial conditions on college campuses across the U.S., focusing on two seminal protests: San Francisco State in 1968 and Cornell University in 1969. At San Francisco State, students and their supporters which included faculty and the increasingly influential Black Panther Party, launched the longest student strike in U.S. history. In addition to demanding curricular changes, the students, who yearned to learn about themselves and their history, demanded increased minority student recruitment and retention, and the hiring of minority faculty. Student activists demonstrated and faced brutal police assaults and massive arrests unleashed by then-Governor Ronald Reagan. Struggling for themselves and the generations of students to come, Black, Latino and Asian student groups worked together to form the Third World Liberation Front. Their efforts birthed the first College of Ethnic Studies in the nation and ignited similar actions across the country. Told through the voices of past student activists and organizers, Agents of Change unfolds with rich archival footage, compelling interviews, and a dynamic soundtrack. Today, nearly half a century later, many of the same demands are surfacing in campus protests across the country, revealing the present intersections Americans find themselves.

Wednesday, December 23rd

12:00am on
Runtime: 01:26:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

Agents of Change

Agents of Change looks at a pivotal moment when our nation was caught at the intersection of the Civil Rights, Black Power, and Anti-Vietnam War Movements. The film examines the racial conditions on college campuses across the U.S., focusing on two seminal protests: San Francisco State in 1968 and Cornell University in 1969. At San Francisco State, students and their supporters which included faculty and the increasingly influential Black Panther Party, launched the longest student strike in U.S. history. In addition to demanding curricular changes, the students, who yearned to learn about themselves and their history, demanded increased minority student recruitment and retention, and the hiring of minority faculty. Student activists demonstrated and faced brutal police assaults and massive arrests unleashed by then-Governor Ronald Reagan. Struggling for themselves and the generations of students to come, Black, Latino and Asian student groups worked together to form the Third World Liberation Front. Their efforts birthed the first College of Ethnic Studies in the nation and ignited similar actions across the country. Told through the voices of past student activists and organizers, Agents of Change unfolds with rich archival footage, compelling interviews, and a dynamic soundtrack. Today, nearly half a century later, many of the same demands are surfacing in campus protests across the country, revealing the present intersections Americans find themselves.

8:00am on
Runtime: 01:26:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

Agents of Change

Agents of Change looks at a pivotal moment when our nation was caught at the intersection of the Civil Rights, Black Power, and Anti-Vietnam War Movements. The film examines the racial conditions on college campuses across the U.S., focusing on two seminal protests: San Francisco State in 1968 and Cornell University in 1969. At San Francisco State, students and their supporters which included faculty and the increasingly influential Black Panther Party, launched the longest student strike in U.S. history. In addition to demanding curricular changes, the students, who yearned to learn about themselves and their history, demanded increased minority student recruitment and retention, and the hiring of minority faculty. Student activists demonstrated and faced brutal police assaults and massive arrests unleashed by then-Governor Ronald Reagan. Struggling for themselves and the generations of students to come, Black, Latino and Asian student groups worked together to form the Third World Liberation Front. Their efforts birthed the first College of Ethnic Studies in the nation and ignited similar actions across the country. Told through the voices of past student activists and organizers, Agents of Change unfolds with rich archival footage, compelling interviews, and a dynamic soundtrack. Today, nearly half a century later, many of the same demands are surfacing in campus protests across the country, revealing the present intersections Americans find themselves.

Saturday, December 26th

10:00pm on
Runtime: 01:26:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

Agents of Change

Agents of Change looks at a pivotal moment when our nation was caught at the intersection of the Civil Rights, Black Power, and Anti-Vietnam War Movements. The film examines the racial conditions on college campuses across the U.S., focusing on two seminal protests: San Francisco State in 1968 and Cornell University in 1969. At San Francisco State, students and their supporters which included faculty and the increasingly influential Black Panther Party, launched the longest student strike in U.S. history. In addition to demanding curricular changes, the students, who yearned to learn about themselves and their history, demanded increased minority student recruitment and retention, and the hiring of minority faculty. Student activists demonstrated and faced brutal police assaults and massive arrests unleashed by then-Governor Ronald Reagan. Struggling for themselves and the generations of students to come, Black, Latino and Asian student groups worked together to form the Third World Liberation Front. Their efforts birthed the first College of Ethnic Studies in the nation and ignited similar actions across the country. Told through the voices of past student activists and organizers, Agents of Change unfolds with rich archival footage, compelling interviews, and a dynamic soundtrack. Today, nearly half a century later, many of the same demands are surfacing in campus protests across the country, revealing the present intersections Americans find themselves.

Sunday, December 27th

2:00am on
Runtime: 01:26:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

Agents of Change

Agents of Change looks at a pivotal moment when our nation was caught at the intersection of the Civil Rights, Black Power, and Anti-Vietnam War Movements. The film examines the racial conditions on college campuses across the U.S., focusing on two seminal protests: San Francisco State in 1968 and Cornell University in 1969. At San Francisco State, students and their supporters which included faculty and the increasingly influential Black Panther Party, launched the longest student strike in U.S. history. In addition to demanding curricular changes, the students, who yearned to learn about themselves and their history, demanded increased minority student recruitment and retention, and the hiring of minority faculty. Student activists demonstrated and faced brutal police assaults and massive arrests unleashed by then-Governor Ronald Reagan. Struggling for themselves and the generations of students to come, Black, Latino and Asian student groups worked together to form the Third World Liberation Front. Their efforts birthed the first College of Ethnic Studies in the nation and ignited similar actions across the country. Told through the voices of past student activists and organizers, Agents of Change unfolds with rich archival footage, compelling interviews, and a dynamic soundtrack. Today, nearly half a century later, many of the same demands are surfacing in campus protests across the country, revealing the present intersections Americans find themselves.

9:00am on
Runtime: 01:26:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

Agents of Change

Agents of Change looks at a pivotal moment when our nation was caught at the intersection of the Civil Rights, Black Power, and Anti-Vietnam War Movements. The film examines the racial conditions on college campuses across the U.S., focusing on two seminal protests: San Francisco State in 1968 and Cornell University in 1969. At San Francisco State, students and their supporters which included faculty and the increasingly influential Black Panther Party, launched the longest student strike in U.S. history. In addition to demanding curricular changes, the students, who yearned to learn about themselves and their history, demanded increased minority student recruitment and retention, and the hiring of minority faculty. Student activists demonstrated and faced brutal police assaults and massive arrests unleashed by then-Governor Ronald Reagan. Struggling for themselves and the generations of students to come, Black, Latino and Asian student groups worked together to form the Third World Liberation Front. Their efforts birthed the first College of Ethnic Studies in the nation and ignited similar actions across the country. Told through the voices of past student activists and organizers, Agents of Change unfolds with rich archival footage, compelling interviews, and a dynamic soundtrack. Today, nearly half a century later, many of the same demands are surfacing in campus protests across the country, revealing the present intersections Americans find themselves.

5:00pm on
Runtime: 01:26:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

Agents of Change

Agents of Change looks at a pivotal moment when our nation was caught at the intersection of the Civil Rights, Black Power, and Anti-Vietnam War Movements. The film examines the racial conditions on college campuses across the U.S., focusing on two seminal protests: San Francisco State in 1968 and Cornell University in 1969. At San Francisco State, students and their supporters which included faculty and the increasingly influential Black Panther Party, launched the longest student strike in U.S. history. In addition to demanding curricular changes, the students, who yearned to learn about themselves and their history, demanded increased minority student recruitment and retention, and the hiring of minority faculty. Student activists demonstrated and faced brutal police assaults and massive arrests unleashed by then-Governor Ronald Reagan. Struggling for themselves and the generations of students to come, Black, Latino and Asian student groups worked together to form the Third World Liberation Front. Their efforts birthed the first College of Ethnic Studies in the nation and ignited similar actions across the country. Told through the voices of past student activists and organizers, Agents of Change unfolds with rich archival footage, compelling interviews, and a dynamic soundtrack. Today, nearly half a century later, many of the same demands are surfacing in campus protests across the country, revealing the present intersections Americans find themselves.

Tuesday, January 5th

8:00pm on
Runtime: 01:26:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

Exit Music

Wednesday, January 6th

12:00am on
Runtime: 01:26:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

Exit Music

8:00am on
Runtime: 01:26:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

Exit Music

Saturday, January 9th

10:00pm on
Runtime: 01:26:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

Exit Music

Sunday, January 10th

2:00am on
Runtime: 01:26:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

Exit Music

9:00am on
Runtime: 01:26:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

Exit Music

5:00pm on
Runtime: 01:26:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

Exit Music

Tuesday, January 12th

8:00pm on
Runtime: 01:26:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

The Invisible Patients

Through the story of Jessica Macleod, Ph.D., a dedicated nurse practitioner in Evansville, Indiana, and her four homebound and marginalized patients, THE INVISIBLE PATIENTS sheds light on some of the most urgent healthcare issues facing our nation today: from the living conditions of the elderly poor and end-of-life care, to the soaring costs of hospitalization, complexity of insurance and overprescription of opiates. It challenges us to wrestle with not just healthcare policy, but as importantly, asks how to care for all persons with dignity and respect.

Wednesday, January 13th

12:00am on
Runtime: 01:26:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

The Invisible Patients

Through the story of Jessica Macleod, Ph.D., a dedicated nurse practitioner in Evansville, Indiana, and her four homebound and marginalized patients, THE INVISIBLE PATIENTS sheds light on some of the most urgent healthcare issues facing our nation today: from the living conditions of the elderly poor and end-of-life care, to the soaring costs of hospitalization, complexity of insurance and overprescription of opiates. It challenges us to wrestle with not just healthcare policy, but as importantly, asks how to care for all persons with dignity and respect.

8:00am on
Runtime: 01:26:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

The Invisible Patients

Through the story of Jessica Macleod, Ph.D., a dedicated nurse practitioner in Evansville, Indiana, and her four homebound and marginalized patients, THE INVISIBLE PATIENTS sheds light on some of the most urgent healthcare issues facing our nation today: from the living conditions of the elderly poor and end-of-life care, to the soaring costs of hospitalization, complexity of insurance and overprescription of opiates. It challenges us to wrestle with not just healthcare policy, but as importantly, asks how to care for all persons with dignity and respect.

Saturday, January 16th

10:00pm on
Runtime: 01:26:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

The Invisible Patients

Through the story of Jessica Macleod, Ph.D., a dedicated nurse practitioner in Evansville, Indiana, and her four homebound and marginalized patients, THE INVISIBLE PATIENTS sheds light on some of the most urgent healthcare issues facing our nation today: from the living conditions of the elderly poor and end-of-life care, to the soaring costs of hospitalization, complexity of insurance and overprescription of opiates. It challenges us to wrestle with not just healthcare policy, but as importantly, asks how to care for all persons with dignity and respect.

Sunday, January 17th

2:00am on
Runtime: 01:26:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

The Invisible Patients

Through the story of Jessica Macleod, Ph.D., a dedicated nurse practitioner in Evansville, Indiana, and her four homebound and marginalized patients, THE INVISIBLE PATIENTS sheds light on some of the most urgent healthcare issues facing our nation today: from the living conditions of the elderly poor and end-of-life care, to the soaring costs of hospitalization, complexity of insurance and overprescription of opiates. It challenges us to wrestle with not just healthcare policy, but as importantly, asks how to care for all persons with dignity and respect.

9:00am on
Runtime: 01:26:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

The Invisible Patients

Through the story of Jessica Macleod, Ph.D., a dedicated nurse practitioner in Evansville, Indiana, and her four homebound and marginalized patients, THE INVISIBLE PATIENTS sheds light on some of the most urgent healthcare issues facing our nation today: from the living conditions of the elderly poor and end-of-life care, to the soaring costs of hospitalization, complexity of insurance and overprescription of opiates. It challenges us to wrestle with not just healthcare policy, but as importantly, asks how to care for all persons with dignity and respect.

5:00pm on
Runtime: 01:26:46
Widescreen
Watch Now!

The Invisible Patients

Through the story of Jessica Macleod, Ph.D., a dedicated nurse practitioner in Evansville, Indiana, and her four homebound and marginalized patients, THE INVISIBLE PATIENTS sheds light on some of the most urgent healthcare issues facing our nation today: from the living conditions of the elderly poor and end-of-life care, to the soaring costs of hospitalization, complexity of insurance and overprescription of opiates. It challenges us to wrestle with not just healthcare policy, but as importantly, asks how to care for all persons with dignity and respect.

Tuesday, January 19th

8:00pm on
Runtime: 00:56:46
Widescreen

The Area NEW

Wednesday, January 20th

12:00am on
Runtime: 00:56:46
Widescreen

The Area

8:00am on
Runtime: 00:56:46
Widescreen

The Area

Saturday, January 23rd

10:00pm on
Runtime: 00:56:46
Widescreen

The Area

Sunday, January 24th

2:00am on
Runtime: 00:56:46
Widescreen

The Area

9:00am on
Runtime: 00:56:46
Widescreen

The Area

5:00pm on
Runtime: 00:56:46
Widescreen

The Area

Tuesday, January 26th

8:00pm on
Runtime: 01:03:23
Widescreen
Watch Now!

Shell Shocked

New Orleans, Louisiana has one of the highest per capita murder rates in the United States. For the last decade, statistics have shown murder rates four to six times higher than the national average. Eighty percent of the victims are black males, mostly in their teenage years. This is the city's greatest neglected crisis with profound implications for the issues of violence and crime most American cities face. New Orleans government, law enforcement, community leaders, and well-intentioned citizens cannot agree on a prognosis or a solution to this situation. Wherever a disagreement is escalating into violence, an execution is being planned, or a victim is taking his last breath, it is more than likely a youth is witnessing or carrying out these actions. SHELL SHOCKED attempts to bridge the gap of this disconnect by hearing the ideas, opinions, and testimonies from activists, community leaders, police, city officials, youth program directors, family and friends of victims, and the children who live in these violent circumstances. We are looking for positive solutions to an extremely negative situation. Currently screening in film festivals around the country, SHELL SHOCKED has been utilized by many different mentoring and advocacy programs, city officials, schools, and churches as a tool to start the dialogue needed for children and young adults living in difficult situations to begin to find a way out. In May 2013, it was used by His Holiness the Dalai Lama during his visit to New Orleans as a bridge in the gap of the disconnect between his message and New Orleans' youth culture, and is also being included in the 2013 National League of Cities Exposition in Seattle. SHELL SHOCKED is the recipient of the Cultural Spirit Award at the 2013 New Hope Film Festival, and the winner of the 2013 Chicago International Social Change Film Festival. It is currently being implemented into a national prison education initiative called Jail Education Solutions, which provides prisoners with positive, educational alternatives to their everyday television programming.

Wednesday, January 27th

12:00am on
Runtime: 01:03:23
Widescreen
Watch Now!

Shell Shocked

New Orleans, Louisiana has one of the highest per capita murder rates in the United States. For the last decade, statistics have shown murder rates four to six times higher than the national average. Eighty percent of the victims are black males, mostly in their teenage years. This is the city's greatest neglected crisis with profound implications for the issues of violence and crime most American cities face. New Orleans government, law enforcement, community leaders, and well-intentioned citizens cannot agree on a prognosis or a solution to this situation. Wherever a disagreement is escalating into violence, an execution is being planned, or a victim is taking his last breath, it is more than likely a youth is witnessing or carrying out these actions. SHELL SHOCKED attempts to bridge the gap of this disconnect by hearing the ideas, opinions, and testimonies from activists, community leaders, police, city officials, youth program directors, family and friends of victims, and the children who live in these violent circumstances. We are looking for positive solutions to an extremely negative situation. Currently screening in film festivals around the country, SHELL SHOCKED has been utilized by many different mentoring and advocacy programs, city officials, schools, and churches as a tool to start the dialogue needed for children and young adults living in difficult situations to begin to find a way out. In May 2013, it was used by His Holiness the Dalai Lama during his visit to New Orleans as a bridge in the gap of the disconnect between his message and New Orleans' youth culture, and is also being included in the 2013 National League of Cities Exposition in Seattle. SHELL SHOCKED is the recipient of the Cultural Spirit Award at the 2013 New Hope Film Festival, and the winner of the 2013 Chicago International Social Change Film Festival. It is currently being implemented into a national prison education initiative called Jail Education Solutions, which provides prisoners with positive, educational alternatives to their everyday television programming.

8:00am on
Runtime: 01:03:23
Widescreen
Watch Now!

Shell Shocked

New Orleans, Louisiana has one of the highest per capita murder rates in the United States. For the last decade, statistics have shown murder rates four to six times higher than the national average. Eighty percent of the victims are black males, mostly in their teenage years. This is the city's greatest neglected crisis with profound implications for the issues of violence and crime most American cities face. New Orleans government, law enforcement, community leaders, and well-intentioned citizens cannot agree on a prognosis or a solution to this situation. Wherever a disagreement is escalating into violence, an execution is being planned, or a victim is taking his last breath, it is more than likely a youth is witnessing or carrying out these actions. SHELL SHOCKED attempts to bridge the gap of this disconnect by hearing the ideas, opinions, and testimonies from activists, community leaders, police, city officials, youth program directors, family and friends of victims, and the children who live in these violent circumstances. We are looking for positive solutions to an extremely negative situation. Currently screening in film festivals around the country, SHELL SHOCKED has been utilized by many different mentoring and advocacy programs, city officials, schools, and churches as a tool to start the dialogue needed for children and young adults living in difficult situations to begin to find a way out. In May 2013, it was used by His Holiness the Dalai Lama during his visit to New Orleans as a bridge in the gap of the disconnect between his message and New Orleans' youth culture, and is also being included in the 2013 National League of Cities Exposition in Seattle. SHELL SHOCKED is the recipient of the Cultural Spirit Award at the 2013 New Hope Film Festival, and the winner of the 2013 Chicago International Social Change Film Festival. It is currently being implemented into a national prison education initiative called Jail Education Solutions, which provides prisoners with positive, educational alternatives to their everyday television programming.

Saturday, January 30th

10:00pm on
Runtime: 01:03:23
Widescreen
Watch Now!

Shell Shocked

New Orleans, Louisiana has one of the highest per capita murder rates in the United States. For the last decade, statistics have shown murder rates four to six times higher than the national average. Eighty percent of the victims are black males, mostly in their teenage years. This is the city's greatest neglected crisis with profound implications for the issues of violence and crime most American cities face. New Orleans government, law enforcement, community leaders, and well-intentioned citizens cannot agree on a prognosis or a solution to this situation. Wherever a disagreement is escalating into violence, an execution is being planned, or a victim is taking his last breath, it is more than likely a youth is witnessing or carrying out these actions. SHELL SHOCKED attempts to bridge the gap of this disconnect by hearing the ideas, opinions, and testimonies from activists, community leaders, police, city officials, youth program directors, family and friends of victims, and the children who live in these violent circumstances. We are looking for positive solutions to an extremely negative situation. Currently screening in film festivals around the country, SHELL SHOCKED has been utilized by many different mentoring and advocacy programs, city officials, schools, and churches as a tool to start the dialogue needed for children and young adults living in difficult situations to begin to find a way out. In May 2013, it was used by His Holiness the Dalai Lama during his visit to New Orleans as a bridge in the gap of the disconnect between his message and New Orleans' youth culture, and is also being included in the 2013 National League of Cities Exposition in Seattle. SHELL SHOCKED is the recipient of the Cultural Spirit Award at the 2013 New Hope Film Festival, and the winner of the 2013 Chicago International Social Change Film Festival. It is currently being implemented into a national prison education initiative called Jail Education Solutions, which provides prisoners with positive, educational alternatives to their everyday television programming.

Sunday, January 31st

2:00am on
Runtime: 00:56:46
Widescreen

The Area

9:00am on
Runtime: 01:03:23
Widescreen
Watch Now!

Shell Shocked

New Orleans, Louisiana has one of the highest per capita murder rates in the United States. For the last decade, statistics have shown murder rates four to six times higher than the national average. Eighty percent of the victims are black males, mostly in their teenage years. This is the city's greatest neglected crisis with profound implications for the issues of violence and crime most American cities face. New Orleans government, law enforcement, community leaders, and well-intentioned citizens cannot agree on a prognosis or a solution to this situation. Wherever a disagreement is escalating into violence, an execution is being planned, or a victim is taking his last breath, it is more than likely a youth is witnessing or carrying out these actions. SHELL SHOCKED attempts to bridge the gap of this disconnect by hearing the ideas, opinions, and testimonies from activists, community leaders, police, city officials, youth program directors, family and friends of victims, and the children who live in these violent circumstances. We are looking for positive solutions to an extremely negative situation. Currently screening in film festivals around the country, SHELL SHOCKED has been utilized by many different mentoring and advocacy programs, city officials, schools, and churches as a tool to start the dialogue needed for children and young adults living in difficult situations to begin to find a way out. In May 2013, it was used by His Holiness the Dalai Lama during his visit to New Orleans as a bridge in the gap of the disconnect between his message and New Orleans' youth culture, and is also being included in the 2013 National League of Cities Exposition in Seattle. SHELL SHOCKED is the recipient of the Cultural Spirit Award at the 2013 New Hope Film Festival, and the winner of the 2013 Chicago International Social Change Film Festival. It is currently being implemented into a national prison education initiative called Jail Education Solutions, which provides prisoners with positive, educational alternatives to their everyday television programming.

5:00pm on
Runtime: 01:03:23
Widescreen
Watch Now!

Shell Shocked

New Orleans, Louisiana has one of the highest per capita murder rates in the United States. For the last decade, statistics have shown murder rates four to six times higher than the national average. Eighty percent of the victims are black males, mostly in their teenage years. This is the city's greatest neglected crisis with profound implications for the issues of violence and crime most American cities face. New Orleans government, law enforcement, community leaders, and well-intentioned citizens cannot agree on a prognosis or a solution to this situation. Wherever a disagreement is escalating into violence, an execution is being planned, or a victim is taking his last breath, it is more than likely a youth is witnessing or carrying out these actions. SHELL SHOCKED attempts to bridge the gap of this disconnect by hearing the ideas, opinions, and testimonies from activists, community leaders, police, city officials, youth program directors, family and friends of victims, and the children who live in these violent circumstances. We are looking for positive solutions to an extremely negative situation. Currently screening in film festivals around the country, SHELL SHOCKED has been utilized by many different mentoring and advocacy programs, city officials, schools, and churches as a tool to start the dialogue needed for children and young adults living in difficult situations to begin to find a way out. In May 2013, it was used by His Holiness the Dalai Lama during his visit to New Orleans as a bridge in the gap of the disconnect between his message and New Orleans' youth culture, and is also being included in the 2013 National League of Cities Exposition in Seattle. SHELL SHOCKED is the recipient of the Cultural Spirit Award at the 2013 New Hope Film Festival, and the winner of the 2013 Chicago International Social Change Film Festival. It is currently being implemented into a national prison education initiative called Jail Education Solutions, which provides prisoners with positive, educational alternatives to their everyday television programming.